CSISA in Nepal

Cereal and pulse yields in Nepal fall well below the regional averages and present rates of increase won’t meet long-term domestic requirements. Factors that contribute to low staple crop performance in Nepal include scarce farm labor, poor knowledge of best agricultural management practices, lack of irrigation and mechanization and farmers’ inability to take risks and invest in new technologies. Also, innovative applied research has long been underfunded and research benefits have rarely reached farmers.

Nepal’s Mid and Far West development regions are most acutely affected by these constraints as these regions have the highest poverty and receive the lowest investment by the private sector. As a result, CSISA works in Nepal’s Terai plains and mid-hills, where the scope for improving farmers’ lives through agriculture is greatest.

CSISA locations in Nepal (click to enlarge)

CSISA locations in Nepal (click to enlarge)

The project works with partners who can help to rapidly and broadly increase the adoption of sustainable intensification technologies at scale. Its partners include Feed the Future’s KISAN project, government agencies, farmers’ groups, service providers, agro-dealers, seed enterprises and other private sector companies. The project’s objectives in Nepal include:

  1. The intensification and diversification of pulses (lentil and mung bean) and their adoption at scale
  2. Scaling up of cropping system-based approaches for sustainably intensifying wheat and minimizing terminal heat stress
  3. Facilitation of efficient and low-risk strategies for the precise and productive use of nutrients
  4. Establishing robust seed systems that ensure timely access to elite cultivars and hybrids
  5. Promoting scale-appropriate mechanization and irrigation

Earthquake Recovery Support Program (EQRSP)

The 2015 earthquake and subsequent aftershocks that struck Nepal have had huge negative impacts on the country’s agriculture and food security. It is estimated that about 8 million people have been affected by the earthquakes, with smallholders in hilly regions being most hard-hit.

EQRSP locations (click to enlarge)

EQRSP locations (click to enlarge)

In response to the devastation, USAID-Nepal is funding a 13-month support program that is being implemented by CSISA in close coordination with the Ministry of Agricultural Development. The program has distributed 50,000 grain storage bags, 30 cocoons for community grain storage, 400 mini-tillers and other modern agriculture power tools (e.g., reapers, maize shellers, seeders), 800 sets (5 items in a set) of small agricultural hand tools and 20,000 posters on better-bet agronomic practices for rice and maize.

The districts receiving support include Dolkha, Kavre, Khotang, Makwanpur, Nuwakot, Ramechap, Sindhupalchowk, and Solukhumbu.

Resources

News

  • Pulse Cultivation Boosts Farm Income in Fallows of Nepal

    Low-risk mungbean expands through public-private partnerships. This year, farmers in Banke, Bardiya, Kailali and Kanchanpur districts of Nepal have successfully cultivated mungbean, which they planted after the wheat harvest and which constitutes a new, third crop in the annual cropping calendar. Without mungbean, the land would be left fallow during this period. Pulse cultivation not only provides extra income but also improves household nutrition and helps farmers enrich their soil fertility. By acreage, lentil is the most important pulse cultivated in Nepal, but due to disease pressures and the risk of crop ...

  • Modern Machinery Opens Up Markets in Nepal

    Efficient and affordable mini-tillers save farmers’ costs and improve rural employment in the earthquake-affected districts of Nepal Mitra Shrestha is a farmer from Nuwakot, one of Nepal’s severe earthquake-affected districts. Like many farmers, Shrestha faced many challenges after the 2015 earthquakes. Due to the huge loss of draft animals and ongoing outmigration of agricultural labor, she has significant difficulty cultivating her agricultural land, which already suffers chronic low productivity. Mini-tillers came to her rescue. Mini-tillers are small cultivators that can quickly prepare soil for agricultural production and seed sowing. With not relying ...

  • Farmers in Nepal Benefit from Earthquake Recovery Support

    CIMMYT’s Earthquake Recovery Support Program (EQRSP) has directly impacted the lives of nearly 50,000 farmers in the earthquake-hit areas of Nepal in the last one year. Supported by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and implemented in cooperation with Nepal’s Ministry of Agricultural Development, the 13-month EQRSP was started in June 2015 through a US$ 1 million grant to CSISA in Nepal. The program has deployed a suite of agricultural assets including mini-tillers and other farm machines, seed and grain storage facilities, agricultural hand tools, technical training and agronomy ...

  • Catalyzing Change in South Asia’s Rice-Based Systems

    The Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia (CSISA) operates in areas with high concentrations of rural poverty, in the Eastern Indo Gangetic Plans of Bangladesh, India and Nepal, where smallholder farmers are most vulnerable to the risks of increasingly erratic weather patterns. It is pertinent to note that the productivity of rice-based systems in these locations continue to be marred by a vast array of issues including, but not limited to, various biotic and abiotic stresses, irregular rains, outdated agronomic techniques, limited infrastructure, poor weed management practices, a lack of ...

  • Accelerating Adoption of Direct Seeded Rice in Bangladesh and Nepal

    Seasonal scarcity of agricultural labor is one of the biggest challenges to the viability and profitability of agriculture in South Asia. This is especially true for rice farmers whose primary method of crop establishment is transplanting rice seedlings into fields that have been repeatedly tilled. Labor constraints mean sowing and transplanting are often delayed, resulting in yield losses. “Despite offering a package of lunch, snacks, dinner and US$ 4 per day, we cannot find many takers,” says Bhabhisara Giri, a farmer from Bardiya district in Nepal. The conventional practice is both ...

CSISA Website

Disclaimer

While every precaution has been taken in the preparation of this website and its contents, Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia (CSISA) and its implementing partner organizations – CIMMYT, IFPRI, ILRI, IRRI and WorldFish – assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. All information and features described herein are subject to change without notice. This website may contain links to third-party websites. CSISA is not responsible for the contents of any linked site or any link contained in a linked site. This website is providing these links only as a convenience, and the inclusion of a link does not imply endorsement by CSISA of the linked sites or their content.

Terms of Use

Copyright © 2014 Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia

Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia (CSISA) holds the copyright to its publications and web pages but encourages use of these materials for non-commercial purposes, unless specifically stated otherwise. Proper citation is requested and prohibits modification of these materials. Permission to make digital or hard copies of part or all of this work for personal or classroom use is hereby granted without fee and without a formal request provided that copies are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and full citation on the first page. For copyrights not owned by CSISA, express permission must be pursued with the owner of the information. To republish or redistribute for commercial purposes, prior permission is required.


Copyright © 2015 CIMMYT