CSISA in India

In India, CSISA activities focus on areas of the eastern Indo-Gangetic Plains dominated by small farm sizes, low incomes and comparatively low levels of agricultural mechanization, irrigation and productivity. Project hubs are located in Bihar, eastern Uttar Pradesh and Odisha.

The project partners with the Indian Council of Agricultural Research, the State Departments of Agriculture, national-level initiatives, livelihoods programs, state agricultural universities, NGOs and private sector entities including agricultural machinery manufacturers, dealers and local service providers.

CSISA’s core interventions in India include:

CSISA_Phase_III_India

CSISA locations in India (click to enlarge)

  1. Directly-sown rice (DSR) to address labor and energy constraints to precision rice establishment
  2. Strengthening the foundations of agro-advisory through knowledge organization and data integration
  3. Building precision nutrient management approaches around established and emerging scaling pathways
  4. Income-generating maize production in neglected hill and plateau ecologies
  5. Rice-fallows development in coastal Odisha
  6. Increasing the capacity of National Agricultural Research and Extension Systems (NARES) to conduct participatory on-farm technology evaluations
  7. Integrated weed management to facilitate sustainable intensification transitions in rice
  8. Accelerating the emergence of mechanized solutions for sustainable intensification
  9. Coping with climate extremes in rice–wheat cropping systems

News

  • Strategic, evidence-based policy: Launching a policy experiment with the Government of Odisha

    The Central Government of India has invested US$ 148.74 billion in the fiscal year 2017–18 to support agricultural development in the country. However, these investments are often unable to target the most relevant needy areas or populations due to lack of concrete evidence of their effectiveness. To support the inclusion of scientific evidence in policy-making processes, CSISA discussed with the Government of the state of Odisha the need for co-generating evidence and for its endorsement to launch a policy experiment on rice-fallow intensification and mechanization options during the 2018–19 Rabi ...

  • Partnering with India’s KVK system to improve data collection and diagnostics

    In India, the Krishi Vigyan Kendra (KVK) network was established in 1974 to serve as district-level “farm science centers” tasked with conducting on-farm tests of agricultural technologies, implementing frontline demonstrations, conducting need-based training programs, serving as local knowledge centers and supporting the marketing of locally relevant agricultural technologies. The KVK system, now comprising 680 KVKs, is overseen by the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) and administered by a group of 11 agricultural technology application research institutes. The KVK is the largest countrywide network that caters to the needs of ...

  • Generating accurate and valid scientific results

    Machine learning (ML) allows software applications to become more accurate in predicting outcomes with increased use. ML involves building algorithms that can predict an output value within an acceptable range. CSISA generates numerous scientific datasets on crop production practices and agronomic field trials, but generating frequent and valid results from these thousands of observations is a challenge. ML tools can help. CSISA organized a five-day workshop in Odisha to train CSISA scientists from Bihar, eastern Uttar Pradesh (EUP) and Odisha in the use of ML tools – based on the open-source statistical ...

  • CSISA and Bihar Agriculture University launch redesigned Soil Health Card

    Bihar Agricultural University (BAU), in collaboration with CSISA, launched a new Soil Health Card in Bihar in February 2018. The Indian Government’s Soil Health Card scheme was launched in 2015 to provide 130 million Indian farmers with a ‘soil report card,’ issued once every two years. Soil health cards reflect indicators of soil health, as determined by a lab-based analysis of soil samples from each farmer’s field. The card also recommends corrective measures to improve the soil, if needed. The scheme’s objective is to help farmers improve soil health and ...

  • Mapping Indian soils at scale

    In India, a wealth of soil analytical data are generated by soil sampling programs such as the All India Soil Sampling Program and the Soil Health Card scheme. These rich data assets allow scientists to use state-of-the-art technologies and methods to produce digital maps of key soil fertility parameters that can support bringing soil fertility recommendations to scale. Digital soil mapping (DSM), defined as the ‘computer-assisted production of digital maps of soil types and soil properties,’ makes use of (geo)statistical models that predict the soil type or property from a limited ...


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